Staten Island

…is HUGE. And diverse. We took the ferry over and walked around the ruins near the terminal. Then a short bus ride to an old theater that is currently under restoration. The St. George is beautiful and crusty, with a vaguely nautical theme as evidenced by the gold maidens jutting from the high walls near the balcony. Next, we took a bus up into a typical neighborhood of the outer boroughs with bungalow style houses all in a row decorated with bathtub Jesus and Marys and shell embellishments. At the end of Hylan Boulevard stands the Alice Austen House. She was a photographer of the late 19th century and of recent renown. She was a bicycle-riding, always socializing photographer who lived with a woman and didn’t care who knew it – a rarity in the barely post Victorian era. The house is lovely and situated for maximum viewage of the Verrazano Bridge (which, of course didn’t exist in the house’s heyday) and lower Manhattan. Alice photographed mostly family and friends, occasionally venturing into Manhattan for some street photography. She developed her 8 x 10 negatives in a closet-sized room upstairs and had to trudge downstairs and out into the garden to wash her negatives. The house contains several binders of her contact prints, passable, but in need of TLC.

We boarded the bus and headed back to the ferry terminal. I would like to return by car to drive to South Beach and check out the boardwalk, to explore the ship graveyard at Arthur Kill, and Castleton – the last stop on the underground railroad after New Jersey. More photos will follow in a week or so.

Click on the photos below to see the full image:

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Coney Island

Coney Island speaks for herself. I was surprised to experience difficulty capturing the spirit of this area – I thought it would be a piece of cake. The color, the people, the sheer beauty of individualism on the boardwalk. But the color was too bright shiny new, and didn’t resemble the Coney Island of my memories. The boardwalk was a little empty – though it was a beautiful spring day – and as for the wild, eclectic crowd? Come back on the weekend.

Some of the icons of the famous boardwalk still exist, albeit despite the overhauling of the neighborhood in recent years by certain “developers”. Watch the following documentary on how Coney Island has been dismantled and cobbled back together again, leaving residents and long-time workers out in the cold:


I walked the boardwalk, ventured a few blocks inland to the concessions, walked the pier, still I didn’t feel I could really capture or even put my finger on the essence of this place. Like many of the neighborhoods I’ve been shooting Coney Island is in transition. But something has stalled. It’s trying to hang on to its heritage after being gutted from the inside out. What remains leaves room for regrowth, but how?  Astroland cannot be regenerated. Displaced residents can’t come back. But there is a strong undercurrent of Coney Island’s unique identity, perhaps just lying low a bit until the development wave washes over it.


Long Island City

LIC sits against the 59th Street Bridge, Newtown Creek and the rail lines. The little triangle consists of upscale residences, old tenement buildings, Silvercup Studios, myriad taxi garages and a vibrant warehouse area feeding a variety of business concerns. You can see Roosevelt Island and the FDR Memorial from its waterfront.

This area is in such a state of transition that it’s very difficult to define. I guess the theme is “change”. Recently a neighborhood of immigrants, LIC still hugs Astoria – a neighborhood so diverse that my school’s religion class takes an annual field trip there to be able to visit a Hindu temple, a mosque, a Greek Orthadox church, a Buddhist temple and a Jewish temple all in the course of a few hours, with time to spare for lunch at a Chinese buffet. But in its very recent history LIC has become the next stop for the Millenial spread from Brooklyn. And the addition of several towering condo buildings and the development of the waterfront signal the financial success of those just a few years advanced in the quest for the great American dream. The death of 5Pointz was a blow to the community and signaled a changing demographic. So while there still exists some of the character of a more typical middle class neighborhood in the boroughs, that seems to be diminishing quickly as prosperity spreads.

Let’s check back in in about ten years and see who can recognize the neighborhood.

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Community Gardens of the Lower East Side

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Back to the Lower East Side, this time to tour a very few of the scores of community gardens in the neighborhood. The flourish of greenspace cultivation started in 1973 with the Green Guerillas, a movement that began with a single seed bomb tossed into a vacant lot.  A reaction to the territorial divides brought about by the financial turmoil of the decade between the foreclosed, the city and urban pioneer developers, the movement quickly gained momentum. Gardeners educated themselves and began to organize; these urban oases sprang up all over the city, but are most concentrated in the East Village and the Lower East Side. This map lists 85 current and former gardens below 14th Street:

Noted on the map are several endangered gardens, and some that have been demolished, so the fate of this movement is still in question.


The Lower East Side

A few Days ago I spent an afternoon walking around the Lower East Side with a group of photographers. We set out to explore some of the classic spots: The Essex Market, Streit’s Matzoh, Katz’s Delicatessan and ABC No Rio. Wait a sec – we just grouped ABC No Rio, an artist/activism collective founded in 1980 with a multi-cultural food market, a matzoh factory and a classic deli. THIS is the beauty of the Lower East Side, and it represents a microcosm of our city in all its diverse and eclectic glory.

This neighborhood is alive with change – electric with possibility. The people, the art on the walls.

Germans settled the neighborhood in the early 19th century. 50 years later Italians and Jewish immigrants arrived, followed by Puerto  Ricans and African Americans after the world wars. Then in the ’80s – the artists; today: gentrification.

Walking these streets and looking closely one can see the imprint each of these groups has had on the neighborhood. And scattered between the old tenement buildings and the new high-rise residences are more community gardens than any other neighborhood in the city. Those are my next stop.


Roosevelt Island

I used to come here fairly frequently when we lived on 59th Street in Manhattan near the bridge. It’s changed a great deal in the last 30 years. There’s a beautiful church that used to stand in a field but is now tightly surrounded by high-rise apartment buildings. The Smallpox hospital at the south end of the island was once a prime destination for urban explorers. Now it stands, nearly demolished, embraced by a chain link fence. It’s future is uncertain. At the very far south end of the island is the new Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, a truly stunning memorial/green space with spectacular views down the length and width of the East River.

Roosevelt Island sits in the East River between Manhattan and Astoria, Queens. You can get there by a bridge from Queens, or the subway. You can also get there by tram. Tram? This is a truly unique feature of this spot.

The island is within spitting distance of either shore, but it has a character all its own.

There’s a tame, suburban quality to the vibe of the place, lots of tourists. There was a film crew lunching between takes at the top of the island when we stopped by to look at the lighthouse. That’s a story in itself – it stands near the former “lunatic asylum” and a resident of said institution apparently built a sea wall to connect Roosevelt Island to a tiny island off its northernmost shore sometime in the 19th century. He claimed responsibility for the lighthouse as well.

The island is rich with history, as are many of the islands that form the archipelago that is our city. Well worth a visit.


Street Photography in Manhattan

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I don’t usually shoot people so this was a bit of a challenge for me. I took these photos as part of a workshop with Eric Kim, aka the Street Photo Guru. I started off in midtown then a buddy suggested we go to Chinatown for the color. It was a blast, if challenging. The rain compounded the challenge and opened my eyes to shooting in conditions other than bright sunlight – my usual milieu. It’s always good to step outside of the comfort zone – lesson learned. Again.


One More Snow on City Island

This has been a rough winter, and we have not escaped it, despite our island status. The neighborhood is quiet during the winter, one of the charms of living here. But it can also become claustrophobic. The wind howls across the water, making it difficult to venture outside. Boats are brought up into dry-dock and block our views to the open water. Gates to the street beaches are locked; even if you could walk through them the beach is covered with washed-up icebergs this year. No quiet reflection at water’s edge for now. Walking the sidewalks can be treacherous with months of hardened ice and heaved-up concrete from the bitter cold and snow.

City Islanders celebrate the holidays with whimsy and good cheer. The Christmas decorations were a bright spot in this dreary winter, and brought smiles to my face as I tromped around in the sub-freezing weather looking for signs of life. Today is the first day of spring; it’s snowing mightily.

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Perhaps this is the last gasp?

Orchard Beach Parking Lot

I came upon this surreal scene when I drove over to the beach to take a walk. The parking lot is huge. It’s a dumping ground for plowed snow from all over this part of the Bronx. I walked into the fog and photographed this other-worldly landscape just as the sky began to clear in the very late afternoon. The last two images were taken on the beach: they show High Island and City Island in the distance, through the mist.