Month: December 2014

Dyker Heights Christmas Spectacle

Frederick Johnson had a good deal to do with the development of this neighborhood in the late nineteenth century. Before it’s transition to a suburban development Dyker Heights was designated as farm land; crops included grains, fruits and vegetables. What began as a largely Anglican enclave evolved into an Italian neighborhood as those immigrants began pouring in during the first half of the twentieth century. Many of the homes were converted to Mediterranean style with notable statuary and topiary adorning their well-manicured yards. Sometime in the 1980’s the residents began outdoing each other with fabulous displays of light and color during the Christmas season. Now Dyker Heights is known as the number one destination for fans of Christmas light displays. I visited at dusk and was enthralled by the transformation as the sun set and the lights clicked on.

I’m looking forward to revisiting the area in the spring. The architecture is intriguing and the location of the neighborhood in the shadow of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge pulls at my curiosity to see what drives this neighborhood during the off-season

Corona Park, Queens

I’ve been to the site of the 1964 World’s Fair a number of times over the years, but it’s been quite a while. On this trip I spent hours walking through the park and realized that it’s much bigger than I remembered. Crossing over the BQE I found the Queens Zoo and the site of a former “state of the art” restaurant experience. I’m drawn to these iconic structures that, now firmly rooted in the past, looked toward a future with such great hope.

Jacob Riis Park

First, I was surprised to discover that this park is in Queens, not Brooklyn. Standing on the beach at Dead Horse Bay, you can look past the span of the Marine Parkway – Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge toward the Rockaways. On the other side of the buildings of the north shore of that spit of land lies the beach, its art deco bath house and numerous other buildings and landmarks – remnants of another Robert Moses project. This beach development was meant to attract lower income families early in the twentieth century. Moses chose this site because it was accessible by bus. Today, the beach looks deserted. Yes, it’s winter. But there’s a general atmosphere of disrepair along the boardwalk. There are no orange fences holding back the encroaching sand, which buries the steps from the beach to the boardwalk. Small buildings are in ruin; handball courts overgrown with weeds and beach grass. Still, there’s something alluring about this place. The buildings were designed to mean something. Attractions – tennis and basketball courts, mini golf – span the roadway running parallel to the boardwalk. It’s a good destination and I look forward to traveling there in season.