Brooklyn

Coney Island

Coney Island speaks for herself. I was surprised to experience difficulty capturing the spirit of this area – I thought it would be a piece of cake. The color, the people, the sheer beauty of individualism on the boardwalk. But the color was too bright shiny new, and didn’t resemble the Coney Island of my memories. The boardwalk was a little empty – though it was a beautiful spring day – and as for the wild, eclectic crowd? Come back on the weekend.

Some of the icons of the famous boardwalk still exist, albeit despite the overhauling of the neighborhood in recent years by certain “developers”. Watch the following documentary on how Coney Island has been dismantled and cobbled back together again, leaving residents and long-time workers out in the cold:

Zipper     http://watch.thirteen.org/video/2365210004/

I walked the boardwalk, ventured a few blocks inland to the concessions, walked the pier, still I didn’t feel I could really capture or even put my finger on the essence of this place. Like many of the neighborhoods I’ve been shooting Coney Island is in transition. But something has stalled. It’s trying to hang on to its heritage after being gutted from the inside out. What remains leaves room for regrowth, but how?  Astroland cannot be regenerated. Displaced residents can’t come back. But there is a strong undercurrent of Coney Island’s unique identity, perhaps just lying low a bit until the development wave washes over it.

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Long Island City

LIC sits against the 59th Street Bridge, Newtown Creek and the rail lines. The little triangle consists of upscale residences, old tenement buildings, Silvercup Studios, myriad taxi garages and a vibrant warehouse area feeding a variety of business concerns. You can see Roosevelt Island and the FDR Memorial from its waterfront.

This area is in such a state of transition that it’s very difficult to define. I guess the theme is “change”. Recently a neighborhood of immigrants, LIC still hugs Astoria – a neighborhood so diverse that my school’s religion class takes an annual field trip there to be able to visit a Hindu temple, a mosque, a Greek Orthadox church, a Buddhist temple and a Jewish temple all in the course of a few hours, with time to spare for lunch at a Chinese buffet. But in its very recent history LIC has become the next stop for the Millenial spread from Brooklyn. And the addition of several towering condo buildings and the development of the waterfront signal the financial success of those just a few years advanced in the quest for the great American dream. The death of 5Pointz was a blow to the community and signaled a changing demographic. So while there still exists some of the character of a more typical middle class neighborhood in the boroughs, that seems to be diminishing quickly as prosperity spreads.

Let’s check back in in about ten years and see who can recognize the neighborhood.

Astoria: The Welling Court Mural Project

This project began around 2008 when an ad hoc committee of local artists formed to spruce up the neighborhood. A mix of residential and industrial, this corner of Astoria is an eclectic array of auto-body shops, single family homes, low-rise apartment buildings and the occasional hipster bistro. Sprinkled among the multiple murals are a number of cars in need of repair. This adds to the surreal nature of the neighborhood and stands as a reminder that, underneath the scratched surface of the vibrant street art, a culture of gritty labor-based commerce remains to support the community

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We explored the neighborhood on a cloudy day – the light slipped away as the afternoon wore on. I’ll be back in the spring; there’s a lot to see here.

Dyker Heights Christmas Spectacle

Frederick Johnson had a good deal to do with the development of this neighborhood in the late nineteenth century. Before it’s transition to a suburban development Dyker Heights was designated as farm land; crops included grains, fruits and vegetables. What began as a largely Anglican enclave evolved into an Italian neighborhood as those immigrants began pouring in during the first half of the twentieth century. Many of the homes were converted to Mediterranean style with notable statuary and topiary adorning their well-manicured yards. Sometime in the 1980’s the residents began outdoing each other with fabulous displays of light and color during the Christmas season. Now Dyker Heights is known as the number one destination for fans of Christmas light displays. I visited at dusk and was enthralled by the transformation as the sun set and the lights clicked on.

I’m looking forward to revisiting the area in the spring. The architecture is intriguing and the location of the neighborhood in the shadow of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge pulls at my curiosity to see what drives this neighborhood during the off-season