collectors

Coney Island

Coney Island speaks for herself. I was surprised to experience difficulty capturing the spirit of this area – I thought it would be a piece of cake. The color, the people, the sheer beauty of individualism on the boardwalk. But the color was too bright shiny new, and didn’t resemble the Coney Island of my memories. The boardwalk was a little empty – though it was a beautiful spring day – and as for the wild, eclectic crowd? Come back on the weekend.

Some of the icons of the famous boardwalk still exist, albeit despite the overhauling of the neighborhood in recent years by certain “developers”. Watch the following documentary on how Coney Island has been dismantled and cobbled back together again, leaving residents and long-time workers out in the cold:

Zipper     http://watch.thirteen.org/video/2365210004/

I walked the boardwalk, ventured a few blocks inland to the concessions, walked the pier, still I didn’t feel I could really capture or even put my finger on the essence of this place. Like many of the neighborhoods I’ve been shooting Coney Island is in transition. But something has stalled. It’s trying to hang on to its heritage after being gutted from the inside out. What remains leaves room for regrowth, but how?  Astroland cannot be regenerated. Displaced residents can’t come back. But there is a strong undercurrent of Coney Island’s unique identity, perhaps just lying low a bit until the development wave washes over it.

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Community Gardens of the Lower East Side

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Back to the Lower East Side, this time to tour a very few of the scores of community gardens in the neighborhood. The flourish of greenspace cultivation started in 1973 with the Green Guerillas, a movement that began with a single seed bomb tossed into a vacant lot.  A reaction to the territorial divides brought about by the financial turmoil of the decade between the foreclosed, the city and urban pioneer developers, the movement quickly gained momentum. Gardeners educated themselves and began to organize; these urban oases sprang up all over the city, but are most concentrated in the East Village and the Lower East Side. This map lists 85 current and former gardens below 14th Street:

http://www.earthcelebrations.com/garden-preservation/les-garden-map/

Noted on the map are several endangered gardens, and some that have been demolished, so the fate of this movement is still in question.