artist

Coney Island

Coney Island speaks for herself. I was surprised to experience difficulty capturing the spirit of this area – I thought it would be a piece of cake. The color, the people, the sheer beauty of individualism on the boardwalk. But the color was too bright shiny new, and didn’t resemble the Coney Island of my memories. The boardwalk was a little empty – though it was a beautiful spring day – and as for the wild, eclectic crowd? Come back on the weekend.

Some of the icons of the famous boardwalk still exist, albeit despite the overhauling of the neighborhood in recent years by certain “developers”. Watch the following documentary on how Coney Island has been dismantled and cobbled back together again, leaving residents and long-time workers out in the cold:

Zipper     http://watch.thirteen.org/video/2365210004/

I walked the boardwalk, ventured a few blocks inland to the concessions, walked the pier, still I didn’t feel I could really capture or even put my finger on the essence of this place. Like many of the neighborhoods I’ve been shooting Coney Island is in transition. But something has stalled. It’s trying to hang on to its heritage after being gutted from the inside out. What remains leaves room for regrowth, but how?  Astroland cannot be regenerated. Displaced residents can’t come back. But there is a strong undercurrent of Coney Island’s unique identity, perhaps just lying low a bit until the development wave washes over it.

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Long Island City

LIC sits against the 59th Street Bridge, Newtown Creek and the rail lines. The little triangle consists of upscale residences, old tenement buildings, Silvercup Studios, myriad taxi garages and a vibrant warehouse area feeding a variety of business concerns. You can see Roosevelt Island and the FDR Memorial from its waterfront.

This area is in such a state of transition that it’s very difficult to define. I guess the theme is “change”. Recently a neighborhood of immigrants, LIC still hugs Astoria – a neighborhood so diverse that my school’s religion class takes an annual field trip there to be able to visit a Hindu temple, a mosque, a Greek Orthadox church, a Buddhist temple and a Jewish temple all in the course of a few hours, with time to spare for lunch at a Chinese buffet. But in its very recent history LIC has become the next stop for the Millenial spread from Brooklyn. And the addition of several towering condo buildings and the development of the waterfront signal the financial success of those just a few years advanced in the quest for the great American dream. The death of 5Pointz was a blow to the community and signaled a changing demographic. So while there still exists some of the character of a more typical middle class neighborhood in the boroughs, that seems to be diminishing quickly as prosperity spreads.

Let’s check back in in about ten years and see who can recognize the neighborhood.

Community Gardens of the Lower East Side

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Back to the Lower East Side, this time to tour a very few of the scores of community gardens in the neighborhood. The flourish of greenspace cultivation started in 1973 with the Green Guerillas, a movement that began with a single seed bomb tossed into a vacant lot.  A reaction to the territorial divides brought about by the financial turmoil of the decade between the foreclosed, the city and urban pioneer developers, the movement quickly gained momentum. Gardeners educated themselves and began to organize; these urban oases sprang up all over the city, but are most concentrated in the East Village and the Lower East Side. This map lists 85 current and former gardens below 14th Street:

http://www.earthcelebrations.com/garden-preservation/les-garden-map/

Noted on the map are several endangered gardens, and some that have been demolished, so the fate of this movement is still in question.