Street Photography

Long Island City

LIC sits against the 59th Street Bridge, Newtown Creek and the rail lines. The little triangle consists of upscale residences, old tenement buildings, Silvercup Studios, myriad taxi garages and a vibrant warehouse area feeding a variety of business concerns. You can see Roosevelt Island and the FDR Memorial from its waterfront.

This area is in such a state of transition that it’s very difficult to define. I guess the theme is “change”. Recently a neighborhood of immigrants, LIC still hugs Astoria – a neighborhood so diverse that my school’s religion class takes an annual field trip there to be able to visit a Hindu temple, a mosque, a Greek Orthadox church, a Buddhist temple and a Jewish temple all in the course of a few hours, with time to spare for lunch at a Chinese buffet. But in its very recent history LIC has become the next stop for the Millenial spread from Brooklyn. And the addition of several towering condo buildings and the development of the waterfront signal the financial success of those just a few years advanced in the quest for the great American dream. The death of 5Pointz was a blow to the community and signaled a changing demographic. So while there still exists some of the character of a more typical middle class neighborhood in the boroughs, that seems to be diminishing quickly as prosperity spreads.

Let’s check back in in about ten years and see who can recognize the neighborhood.

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The Lower East Side

A few Days ago I spent an afternoon walking around the Lower East Side with a group of photographers. We set out to explore some of the classic spots: The Essex Market, Streit’s Matzoh, Katz’s Delicatessan and ABC No Rio. Wait a sec – we just grouped ABC No Rio, an artist/activism collective founded in 1980 with a multi-cultural food market, a matzoh factory and a classic deli. THIS is the beauty of the Lower East Side, and it represents a microcosm of our city in all its diverse and eclectic glory.

This neighborhood is alive with change – electric with possibility. The people, the art on the walls.

Germans settled the neighborhood in the early 19th century. 50 years later Italians and Jewish immigrants arrived, followed by Puerto  Ricans and African Americans after the world wars. Then in the ’80s – the artists; today: gentrification.

Walking these streets and looking closely one can see the imprint each of these groups has had on the neighborhood. And scattered between the old tenement buildings and the new high-rise residences are more community gardens than any other neighborhood in the city. Those are my next stop.

Roosevelt Island

I used to come here fairly frequently when we lived on 59th Street in Manhattan near the bridge. It’s changed a great deal in the last 30 years. There’s a beautiful church that used to stand in a field but is now tightly surrounded by high-rise apartment buildings. The Smallpox hospital at the south end of the island was once a prime destination for urban explorers. Now it stands, nearly demolished, embraced by a chain link fence. It’s future is uncertain. At the very far south end of the island is the new Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, a truly stunning memorial/green space with spectacular views down the length and width of the East River.

Roosevelt Island sits in the East River between Manhattan and Astoria, Queens. You can get there by a bridge from Queens, or the subway. You can also get there by tram. Tram? This is a truly unique feature of this spot.

The island is within spitting distance of either shore, but it has a character all its own.

There’s a tame, suburban quality to the vibe of the place, lots of tourists. There was a film crew lunching between takes at the top of the island when we stopped by to look at the lighthouse. That’s a story in itself – it stands near the former “lunatic asylum” and a resident of said institution apparently built a sea wall to connect Roosevelt Island to a tiny island off its northernmost shore sometime in the 19th century. He claimed responsibility for the lighthouse as well.

The island is rich with history, as are many of the islands that form the archipelago that is our city. Well worth a visit.

Street Photography in Manhattan

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I don’t usually shoot people so this was a bit of a challenge for me. I took these photos as part of a workshop with Eric Kim, aka the Street Photo Guru. I started off in midtown then a buddy suggested we go to Chinatown for the color. It was a blast, if challenging. The rain compounded the challenge and opened my eyes to shooting in conditions other than bright sunlight – my usual milieu. It’s always good to step outside of the comfort zone – lesson learned. Again.